Hibotan who is dying

Hibotan who is dying

Question: hibotan that is dying


hi I have a hibotan graft dying to me. The rootstock is yellow with soft brownish parts, while the strawberry cactus does not seem very damaged. It is a pity to let it die because the strawberry cactus has very many shoots of the same species all around it. WHAT SHOULD I DO?
I await answers.
KIND REGARDS.


Answer: hibotan that is dying


Dear Gabriele,
hibotan grafts consist of a columnar rootstock plant (various types of cereus of various types, often hilocereus), on which mutated specimens of gymnocalycium are grafted; these grafts are necessary to make the mutated plant survive, because being bizarre in color it is completely free of chlorophyll, and therefore is not able to survive on its own. If the plant rootstock is ill, the fungi that have affected it have already penetrated the gymnocalycium, and therefore it is very likely that the mutant will die as well. You can, however, try to remove it from the rootstock, and check that the tissues inside it are clear and healthy, with no yellow or dark parts. But first you have to get yourself another plant to be able to repeat the graft, in order to give the mutant another support for his life. However, consider that the gymnocalycium detached from the rootstock can survive for a few days without problems, so you can detach it today, let it dry for several hours, and repeat the grafting in the next few days. Generally we use hilocereus, or opuntia stumps, the important thing is that it is a cactacea, and not an euphorbie (cactaceae do not take root on euphorbias, because they belong to very different families). After resting the gymnocalycium on the columnar cactus stump, place the vase in a semi-shaded place, because the mutant does not like the direct sun much. Then water with great caution, to avoid repeating the previous experience. Often it happens that mutants, if left to develop on their own, return to their original form: that is, you can simply try to detach the gymnocalycium and let it root alone in a vase; these small cacti sometimes tend to produce the chlorophyll they need again, but they take on much less brilliant colors, usually they turn brown, but they are able to survive without the support of other plants, which makes them easier to grow and handle. In fact the death of these grafts is often due to differences in cultivation requirements between the graft holder and the grafted plant; in your case, the rootstock loves direct sun and scarce watering, while the gymno prefers half shade.